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Na Pali Coast Ohana
 Committed to protect, preserve and educate

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Park Projects

Nuʻalolo Kai Archaeological Resource Management Project
  Nā Pali Coast ʻOhana members mālama ʻāina (care for the land and everything on her). Photo courtesy of www.napaliphoto.com

This project has been the main focus of the ʻOhana's efforts for the past several years. In cooperation with the State Parks Archaeology Program, the group has assisted with clearing of vegetation, removal of invasive species, and archaeological research in this small but spectacular area of the coast.

Continual maintenance of the area is needed to keep the encroaching vegetation from covering fragile archaeological sites, allowing them to be viewed, and for site documentation to be conducted by archaeological staff.

Moana Lee, a volunteer archaeologist and ʻOhana member, helps map a newly discovered ancient site in Nʻualolo Kai. Photo courtesy of www.napaliphoto.com  

Future goals include implementing a program of test excavation with the aim of learning more about the function and age of various features, stabilization and restoration of damaged archaeological features, and re-establishment of native and polynesian introduced plants in an effort to recreate the cultural landscape which existed in prehistoric times.

The Nʻualolo Kai project received an Historic Preservation Honor Award in 2001 from the Historic Hawaiʻi Foundation.


YouTube video courtesy of Save Our Seas

Educational Outreach

The ʻOhana speaks to the community through a variety of forums to educate people about the plight of Nāpali's resources. Among these programs are an effort to educate the tour guides who escort and educate visitors to Kauaʻi.

Future goals include creation of a "Nāpali in the schools" program aimed at encouraging our youngest residents to join us in our stewardship, custom tours of the coast which convey the foundation's message, and coordination with the State Parks Division to better educate day-users and campers about how they can help protect the coast.

Kalalau/Hanakāpiʻai Beach Clean-ups

The foundation has coordinated multiple major clean-ups of beach and camping areas on the coast, where trash is continually left behind by campers and illegal squatters. These efforts require inter-agency coordination and are very costly, as they require helicopters to sling-load out the gathered rubbish.

It is hoped that with a greater emphasis on education and resource management, the need to conduct such clean-ups will decline, and the foundation can focus its efforts on research and enhancement of public areas.

Nuʻalolo Kai Native Garden

During the work trips in the summer of 2009, an area adjacent to the primary path in Nuʻalolo Kai was cleared, fenced to exclude goats, and planted with native and canoe plants. Work continued in 2010 and 2011 to remove weeds that flourished in the absence of the goats. This Nuʻalolo Kai Native Garden project was funded by a grant from the Hawaii Tourism Authority.
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Nualolo Kai Garden Brochure Page1 and 4 View/Download Brochure (Part 1)
Nualolo Kai Garden Brochure Page2 and 3 View/Download Brochure (Part 2)



plants of Nu'alolo Kai View the Plants of Nuʻalolo Kai
Updated: 2014-05-15T23:33:49-1000 (HST)